経営学学士

The business world has changed dramatically in the last decade as globalization has made the management of businesses more complex and demanding. Companies around the world are in need of managers who can operate in a borderless and multicultural environment.

Enderun believes that most traditional business programs do not sufficiently prepare students for the global nature of today’s business environment. The Enderun business program has a global business theme at its core, shaping the content of its courses, teaching methods, industry partnerships, and internships.

Graduates of the Enderun College of Business will have developed an international outlook on life and will be equipped with the skills to start building a global career.

The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration has five majors:

Financial Management

The Specialization in Wealth Management develops skills in financial management in a global context, uniquely preparing graduates for careers in wealth management, an emphasis not available elsewhere. Finance students are exposed to capital and financial markets, asset valuation, and investment portfolio management as well as fundamental concepts in behavioral finance and financial risk management.

Marketing Management

The Specialization in Digital Marketing prepares its graduates to craft effective, relevant, and modern marketing executions by arming them with a practical understanding of buyer behavior, advertising, professional selling and contemporary CRM-Customer Relationship Management.

Operations Management

The Specialization in Business Process Management and Consulting trains students in professional consulting, especially in process improvement and management for multinational business enterprises.

Technology Management

The Specialization in Business Technology Management will help bridge the gap between business and technology departments of an organization in any industry. This program produces forward-thinking graduates with the knowledge and skills in entrepreneurship and technical innovations, necessary to become project leaders and managers any organization.

Sustainability

The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration major in Sustainability aims to cultivate the next generation of leaders to make business decisions with environmental and social responsibility in mind. The course integrates sustainability in every aspect of a business – from strategy and planning, to product development and distribution. It enables students to understand core management skills, while learning to identify appropriate sustainable solutions with a substantial and profitable end goal.

BSBA Faculty

Faculty members of the College of Business, Technology and Entrepreneurship, with their expertise in the field of business either as academics or industry practitioners, reflect leading practices to deliver extensive real-world perspectives to business theory and practice.

INTERNSHIP

Enderun prides itself with giving real-life experience to students. At the College of Business, Technology, and Entrepreneurship students are required to take at least two internships before they graduate. They are advised to take at least one of their internships outside of the Philippines to broaden their horizons, build character and provide a real-life reference to the international nature of the program.

Career Placement

Students in their senior year at Enderun’s BSBA program can seek internship placements at the Office of Career Services. The department will find the suitable job that matches your profile and personal objectives.

BSBA Curriculum + Course Description

The Enderun Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) program provides its students with rigorous training in fundamental professional and business skills, while giving students practical and real-life knowledge through experience-based teaching methods and challenging internships. The Enderun business program’s strong international orientation, cemented by a faculty of foreign academics and industry experts from leading business organizations, prepares students for a career in the global business environment, be it as entrepreneurs or corporate executives. Students also select one among the three majors on which to focus their studies: Financial Management, Marketing Management, or Operations Management.

General Education
Intermediate English
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The student-as-critical thinker must first become aware of his or her skill level in English communication before delving into academic discourse. Students will be imbued with the traits of intellectual honesty, thorough research, accuracy in presentation of information, revising ideas and positions in light of new or better information, and in proper attribution of information.English Communication 1 will lay the groundwork for developing the writing skills acquired by the students in their previous years of education. This course intends to consolidate the students’ grasp of the basics by bringing their English skills a step higher. The students will be instructed in formal and informal writing. A methodical approach will be taken to help them learn how to take a proper, educated stand on a given issue as well as to enrich their individual styles.The Enderun English courses takes students through a progressive sequence of lessons and exercises giving them a holistic view of different communication styles and strategies that may get them going on the career path that they choose.
Advanced English
Prerequisite ENG 1
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
At a time when text can be produced by the megabyte and transmitted worldwide in seconds, a person’s ability to process and communicate information is crucial in all undertakings. Enderun students must not only be fluent in the English language; they must also critically sort the ideas being presented. The critical thinker tries to isolate the issue in a book, magazine or paper into its barest categorical form and differentiate fact from opinion before making a judgment.English Communication 2 will build on the foundation of English Communication 1. It aims to raise the skills of the students by going through a critical survey of the forms of academic discourse essential to collegiate and professional work. This course integrates the students’ ability to think and converse, inform and persuade others on given issues. It also aims to incorporate logical thinking and in-depth, critical analysis and discussion of issues dealing with matters relevant to students and the industry. The topics are light, even faddish yet close to the experiences of the youth. More importantly, premium is still given to research and fundamentals of academic work. Enderun students aspire to lead the hospitality industry. The Enderun English courses will take these aspirants through a progressive sequence of lessons and exercises giving them a holistic view of different communication styles and strategies that will get them going on their chosen career path.
Sining ng Pakikipagtalastasan
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Nilalaman ng kursong ito ang pagtalakay sa kahalagahan ng Wikang Filipino sa realidad na kanyang ginagalawan. Tatalakayin dito ang kasaysayan, kahalagahan, kasanayan at gamit ng wikang Filipino bilang buhay na wika at midyum ng komunikasyong pasalita at pagsulat.
Pagbasa’t Pagsulat sa iba’t-ibang Disiplina
Prerequisite FIL 1
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Angkop ng asignaturang ito ang paggamit ng Wikang Filipino sa pagbasa at pagsulat bilang kasangkapan ng pagkatuto. Binibigyang tuon ng kursong ito ang kasanayan ng mga mag-aaral sa pagsasaling-wika, pakikipanayam, at paggamit ng Filipino sa talakayan, pananaliksik, at sa pagsulat ng iba’t ibang sulating akademik.
Business Math
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course discusses the application of mathematical principles to a variety of business contexts, with particular emphasis on the fundamental concepts and principles in investment mathematics and their practical applications: this part of the course covers a range of topics such as percentages, simple and compound interest, annuities, amortizations and sinking funds, discounts (trade, bank, and cash), perpetuity, payroll, time value of money, and business loans. The goal of the entire course is to equip students with fundamental skills for critically analyzing and solving business-related mathematical problems and for making sound financial decisions in general.
Basic Statistics
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The course is for future decision makers in business. The focus and goal is to make students better quantitative decision makers. The concepts of statistics are presented in the setting of business decision-making through the use of many real world examples, real business data and applications. This course covers introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are discrete and continuous data, concepts such as population, sample, parameter, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, coefficient of variation, some probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, z-test, t-test, analysis of variance, simple regression and correlation analysis.
Environmental Science
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course provides an integrated coverage of the basic concepts and principles of ecology. It deals mainly with the study of the biotic components of ecosystem, nature of life, its attributes, processes and unity in diversity of all life forms in performing their ecological roles. Further, it helps students to demonstrate attitudes, values and actions desirable and appropriate to fostering man’s harmonious relationship with his total environment through sustainable development and ecologically balanced ecosystem.
Environmental Science
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course provides an integrated coverage of the basic concepts and principles of ecology. It deals mainly with the study of the biotic components of ecosystem, nature of life, its attributes, processes and unity in diversity of all life forms in performing their ecological roles. Further, it helps students to demonstrate attitudes, values and actions desirable and appropriate to fostering man’s harmonious relationship with his total environment through sustainable development and ecologically balanced ecosystem.
Biological Science
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology and explore life. It will open their minds to man’s social, emotional, spiritual, intellectual and moral being.
General Psychology
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course serves as a synopsis of the different fields of psychology. Theoretical frameworks and their application to contemporary issues such as social psychology, stereotyping and personality will be given special emphasis.
Philippine History, Government and Constitution
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is a comprehensive survey of the development of the Filipino people, from its earliest anthropological and cultural origins to the birth and evolution of national consciousness. The course emphasizes the latter, the struggle for freedom and independence, the development of political, economic and social institutions, as well as key events in recent Philippine history, from the post-World War II independence until the present. A significant section of the course is also devoted to a study of the Philippine constitutional framework and how the specific provisions of its most recent iteration, the 1987 constitution; apply to contemporary Philippine society, particularly to the Philippine political system.
World History
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course takes a thematic approach to the study of world history, covering the principal forces, events, personalities and ideas that shaped civilization from antiquity until the post World War II era.
Cultural Anthropology
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is an introduction of the field of sociology and anthropology. It assumes that social and cultural forces external to individuals shape behavior. It aims to identify, understand and explain what these specific forces are and how they shape behavior with cultural communities. This course will introduce to this discipline examining the history, the work of its early and contemporary contributors, essential concepts, research methods, theory and application with the end of equipping the students with the tools to understand and analyze the issues that affect Philippine society and the rest of the world.
Introduction to Humanities
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course introduces the student to the basic principles relevant to the appreciation of various art forms and its elements as the language used to express beauty. The course makes use of a broad survey of the fine arts—i.e., architecture, painting, sculpture— and widely-acknowledged representative works in order to help students understand the major definitions of art and beauty, become familiar with the nuances of art production and the creative process as influenced by various factors, and an ability to analyze art work based on the elements of the art form and principles of design. The objective of the course is not to produce performers or practitioners of the fine arts, but develop in students the ability to make a critical and intelligent assessment of works of art, based on theoretical and practical understanding of art forms, its component elements, cultural and historical influences, and the creative process.
Introduction to Philosophy
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course introduces the student to major themes of philosophical inquiry, particularly that of the nature of the human person and the central issues of freedom, knowledge and the truth, interpersonal relations, and the search for the meaning and purpose of life. The course not only provides students with a general philosophical understanding of what it means to be a person, but also to deepen that misunderstanding with a knowledge of how personhood relates to other aspects of reality.
Literature
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course presents a survey of the World and the Philippine Literature in English, from its beginning to the present with an emphasis on the different types of genres. The literature of the different regions of the World and the Philippines, whether in native or foreign languages.
Basic Computer
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is an introduction to information technology and its major areas, including computer hardware and networking, computer operating systems, and common business and productivity applications. A substantial portion of the course is devoted to helping students acquire proficiency in the functional and effective use of common office automation applications such as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software applications, with particular emphasis on word processing and presentations, in order to make students capable of producing high quality documents from both a technical and an aesthetic viewpoint.
Life and Works of Rizal
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course traces the intellectual development of Jose Rizal, from his boyhood years until his final hours, and is divided by key watershed events in his life: the writing of the Noli Me Tangere, the writing of the El Filibusterismo, and his deportation to Dapitan until his execution. The course studies significant parts of the Noli and the Fili alongside frequent references to his diaries, letters, and essays, with the aim of ultimately helping the student understand the relevance and timeliness of Rizal’s insights as they apply to contemporary Philippine society.
Fundamentals of Physical Fitness
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 2 units (2 hours of lecture and laboratory per week)
The course provides students with information and interpretation of physical fitness through a study of how the human body reacts, responds and adapts to physical exertion. It also introduces students to the changing trends in physical fitness. Furthermore, the course familiarizes students to the benefits of physical fitness thus encouraging them to develop their health.
FUTSAL
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
This is an introductory course in the theory and techniques of futsal. The content focuses on the basic skills of futsal and its application to the game including strategies and tactics. Furthermore, the student will learn about the futsal laws of the game. As result of the class, the student will improve his / her general physical fitness and skill performance. The technical, tactical, physical, psychological, and social aspects of the game will also be taken up.
RUNNING
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
This course will provide the means for developing fitness through running and conditioning. The content focuses on the basic fundamentals of running and its application to the game including strategies and physical conditioning. The course will also reinforce concepts on fitness, health and wellness. Consequently, students will realize the importance of lifetime participation in physical activities for wellness of life.
BASKETBALL
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
Practical sessions on basic ball handling, shooting, dribbling, and strategies. Short lectures on history, equipment, and rules of basketball.
TAI CHI
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
This course is an introduction to an internal art that cultivates, harmonizes and refines one’s total personality (mind, body, spirit and emotion). It lets the student actually experience the essence and different faces of Tai Chi Chuan. Through the short journey of 18 weeks, the students will be led to a hands-on understanding, experience and, hopefully, an appreciation of the basic essence of Tai Chi, its holistic benefits, and different aspects as one is led to further cultivate myriad positive values, including respect, commitment, focus, sense of contribution, humility, discipline, patience, perseverance, adaptability, and open-mindedness.
VOLLEYBALL
Prerequisite PE 101
Course Credit
This is an introductory course in the theory and techniques of volleyball. The content focuses on the basic skills of volleyball and its application to the game including strategies and tactics. Furthermore, the student will learn about the volleyball laws of the game. As result of the class, the student will improve his / her general physical fitness and skill performance. The technical, tactical, physical, psychological, and social aspects of the game will also be taken up.
National Service Training Program
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 2 units (2 hours of lecture and laboratory per week)
As a requirement for graduation, students are required to complete two semesters of the National Service Training Program (NSTP) in any of three components: Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS), Literacy Training Service (LTS) and Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). CWTS refers to programs or activities contributory to the general welfare and the betterment of life for the members of the community or the enhancement of its facilities, especially those devoted to improving health, education, environment, entrepreneurship, safety, recreation and morals of the citizenry. LTS refers to the program component designed to train the students to teach literacy and numeric skills to schoolchildren, out-of-school youths and other segments of society in need of their services. Finally, ROTC refers to the program component institutionalized under Section 38 and 39 of Republic Act no. 7077, designed to provide military training to tertiary level students in order to motivate, train, organize and mobilize them for national defense preparedness. Students who opt to take either CWTS or LTS components can enroll in the College’s own NSTP offerings, while students who opt for ROTC must cross-enroll in a duly accredited tertiary institution offering such a component.
National Service Training Program: CWTS or Literacy Training Service
Prerequisite NSTP 1
Course Credit 2 units (2 hours of lecture and laboratory per week)
As a requirement for graduation, students are required to complete two semesters of the National Service Training Program (NSTP) in any of three components: Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS), Literacy Training Service (LTS) and Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). CWTS refers to programs or activities contributory to the general welfare and the betterment of life for the members of the community or the enhancement of its facilities, especially those devoted to improving health, education, environment, entrepreneurship, safety, recreation and morals of the citizenry. LTS refers to the program component designed to train the students to teach literacy and numeric skills to schoolchildren, out-of-school youths and other segments of society in need of their services. Finally, ROTC refers to the program component institutionalized under Section 38 and 39 of Republic Act no. 7077, designed to provide military training to tertiary level students in order to motivate, train, organize and mobilize them for national defense preparedness. Students who opt to take either CWTS or LTS components can enroll in the College’s own NSTP offerings, while students who opt for ROTC must cross-enroll in a duly accredited tertiary institution offering such a component.
Basic Business Core
Intermediate English
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The student-as-critical thinker must first become aware of his or her skill level in English communication before delving into academic discourse. Students will be imbued with the traits of intellectual honesty, thorough research, accuracy in presentation of information, revising ideas and positions in light of new or better information, and in proper attribution of information.English Communication 1 will lay the groundwork for developing the writing skills acquired by the students in their previous years of education. This course intends to consolidate the students’ grasp of the basics by bringing their English skills a step higher. The students will be instructed in formal and informal writing. A methodical approach will be taken to help them learn how to take a proper, educated stand on a given issue as well as to enrich their individual styles.The Enderun English courses takes students through a progressive sequence of lessons and exercises giving them a holistic view of different communication styles and strategies that may get them going on the career path that they choose.
Advanced English
Prerequisite ENG 1
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
At a time when text can be produced by the megabyte and transmitted worldwide in seconds, a person’s ability to process and communicate information is crucial in all undertakings. Enderun students must not only be fluent in the English language; they must also critically sort the ideas being presented. The critical thinker tries to isolate the issue in a book, magazine or paper into its barest categorical form and differentiate fact from opinion before making a judgment.English Communication 2 will build on the foundation of English Communication 1. It aims to raise the skills of the students by going through a critical survey of the forms of academic discourse essential to collegiate and professional work. This course integrates the students’ ability to think and converse, inform and persuade others on given issues. It also aims to incorporate logical thinking and in-depth, critical analysis and discussion of issues dealing with matters relevant to students and the industry. The topics are light, even faddish yet close to the experiences of the youth. More importantly, premium is still given to research and fundamentals of academic work. Enderun students aspire to lead the hospitality industry. The Enderun English courses will take these aspirants through a progressive sequence of lessons and exercises giving them a holistic view of different communication styles and strategies that will get them going on their chosen career path.
Sining ng Pakikipagtalastasan
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Nilalaman ng kursong ito ang pagtalakay sa kahalagahan ng Wikang Filipino sa realidad na kanyang ginagalawan. Tatalakayin dito ang kasaysayan, kahalagahan, kasanayan at gamit ng wikang Filipino bilang buhay na wika at midyum ng komunikasyong pasalita at pagsulat.
Pagbasa’t Pagsulat sa iba’t-ibang Disiplina
Prerequisite FIL 1
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Angkop ng asignaturang ito ang paggamit ng Wikang Filipino sa pagbasa at pagsulat bilang kasangkapan ng pagkatuto. Binibigyang tuon ng kursong ito ang kasanayan ng mga mag-aaral sa pagsasaling-wika, pakikipanayam, at paggamit ng Filipino sa talakayan, pananaliksik, at sa pagsulat ng iba’t ibang sulating akademik.
Business Math
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course discusses the application of mathematical principles to a variety of business contexts, with particular emphasis on the fundamental concepts and principles in investment mathematics and their practical applications: this part of the course covers a range of topics such as percentages, simple and compound interest, annuities, amortizations and sinking funds, discounts (trade, bank, and cash), perpetuity, payroll, time value of money, and business loans. The goal of the entire course is to equip students with fundamental skills for critically analyzing and solving business-related mathematical problems and for making sound financial decisions in general.
Basic Statistics
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The course is for future decision makers in business. The focus and goal is to make students better quantitative decision makers. The concepts of statistics are presented in the setting of business decision-making through the use of many real world examples, real business data and applications. This course covers introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are discrete and continuous data, concepts such as population, sample, parameter, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, coefficient of variation, some probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, z-test, t-test, analysis of variance, simple regression and correlation analysis.
Environmental Science
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course provides an integrated coverage of the basic concepts and principles of ecology. It deals mainly with the study of the biotic components of ecosystem, nature of life, its attributes, processes and unity in diversity of all life forms in performing their ecological roles. Further, it helps students to demonstrate attitudes, values and actions desirable and appropriate to fostering man’s harmonious relationship with his total environment through sustainable development and ecologically balanced ecosystem.
Environmental Science
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course provides an integrated coverage of the basic concepts and principles of ecology. It deals mainly with the study of the biotic components of ecosystem, nature of life, its attributes, processes and unity in diversity of all life forms in performing their ecological roles. Further, it helps students to demonstrate attitudes, values and actions desirable and appropriate to fostering man’s harmonious relationship with his total environment through sustainable development and ecologically balanced ecosystem.
Biological Science
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology and explore life. It will open their minds to man’s social, emotional, spiritual, intellectual and moral being.
General Psychology
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course serves as a synopsis of the different fields of psychology. Theoretical frameworks and their application to contemporary issues such as social psychology, stereotyping and personality will be given special emphasis.
Philippine History, Government and Constitution
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is a comprehensive survey of the development of the Filipino people, from its earliest anthropological and cultural origins to the birth and evolution of national consciousness. The course emphasizes the latter, the struggle for freedom and independence, the development of political, economic and social institutions, as well as key events in recent Philippine history, from the post-World War II independence until the present. A significant section of the course is also devoted to a study of the Philippine constitutional framework and how the specific provisions of its most recent iteration, the 1987 constitution; apply to contemporary Philippine society, particularly to the Philippine political system.
World History
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course takes a thematic approach to the study of world history, covering the principal forces, events, personalities and ideas that shaped civilization from antiquity until the post World War II era.
Cultural Anthropology
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is an introduction of the field of sociology and anthropology. It assumes that social and cultural forces external to individuals shape behavior. It aims to identify, understand and explain what these specific forces are and how they shape behavior with cultural communities. This course will introduce to this discipline examining the history, the work of its early and contemporary contributors, essential concepts, research methods, theory and application with the end of equipping the students with the tools to understand and analyze the issues that affect Philippine society and the rest of the world.
Introduction to Humanities
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course introduces the student to the basic principles relevant to the appreciation of various art forms and its elements as the language used to express beauty. The course makes use of a broad survey of the fine arts—i.e., architecture, painting, sculpture— and widely-acknowledged representative works in order to help students understand the major definitions of art and beauty, become familiar with the nuances of art production and the creative process as influenced by various factors, and an ability to analyze art work based on the elements of the art form and principles of design. The objective of the course is not to produce performers or practitioners of the fine arts, but develop in students the ability to make a critical and intelligent assessment of works of art, based on theoretical and practical understanding of art forms, its component elements, cultural and historical influences, and the creative process.
Introduction to Philosophy
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course introduces the student to major themes of philosophical inquiry, particularly that of the nature of the human person and the central issues of freedom, knowledge and the truth, interpersonal relations, and the search for the meaning and purpose of life. The course not only provides students with a general philosophical understanding of what it means to be a person, but also to deepen that misunderstanding with a knowledge of how personhood relates to other aspects of reality.
Literature
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course presents a survey of the World and the Philippine Literature in English, from its beginning to the present with an emphasis on the different types of genres. The literature of the different regions of the World and the Philippines, whether in native or foreign languages.
Basic Computer
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is an introduction to information technology and its major areas, including computer hardware and networking, computer operating systems, and common business and productivity applications. A substantial portion of the course is devoted to helping students acquire proficiency in the functional and effective use of common office automation applications such as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software applications, with particular emphasis on word processing and presentations, in order to make students capable of producing high quality documents from both a technical and an aesthetic viewpoint.
Life and Works of Rizal
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course traces the intellectual development of Jose Rizal, from his boyhood years until his final hours, and is divided by key watershed events in his life: the writing of the Noli Me Tangere, the writing of the El Filibusterismo, and his deportation to Dapitan until his execution. The course studies significant parts of the Noli and the Fili alongside frequent references to his diaries, letters, and essays, with the aim of ultimately helping the student understand the relevance and timeliness of Rizal’s insights as they apply to contemporary Philippine society.
Fundamentals of Physical Fitness
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 2 units (2 hours of lecture and laboratory per week)
The course provides students with information and interpretation of physical fitness through a study of how the human body reacts, responds and adapts to physical exertion. It also introduces students to the changing trends in physical fitness. Furthermore, the course familiarizes students to the benefits of physical fitness thus encouraging them to develop their health.
FUTSAL
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
This is an introductory course in the theory and techniques of futsal. The content focuses on the basic skills of futsal and its application to the game including strategies and tactics. Furthermore, the student will learn about the futsal laws of the game. As result of the class, the student will improve his / her general physical fitness and skill performance. The technical, tactical, physical, psychological, and social aspects of the game will also be taken up.
RUNNING
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
This course will provide the means for developing fitness through running and conditioning. The content focuses on the basic fundamentals of running and its application to the game including strategies and physical conditioning. The course will also reinforce concepts on fitness, health and wellness. Consequently, students will realize the importance of lifetime participation in physical activities for wellness of life.
BASKETBALL
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
Practical sessions on basic ball handling, shooting, dribbling, and strategies. Short lectures on history, equipment, and rules of basketball.
TAI CHI
Prerequisite PE 1
Course Credit
This course is an introduction to an internal art that cultivates, harmonizes and refines one’s total personality (mind, body, spirit and emotion). It lets the student actually experience the essence and different faces of Tai Chi Chuan. Through the short journey of 18 weeks, the students will be led to a hands-on understanding, experience and, hopefully, an appreciation of the basic essence of Tai Chi, its holistic benefits, and different aspects as one is led to further cultivate myriad positive values, including respect, commitment, focus, sense of contribution, humility, discipline, patience, perseverance, adaptability, and open-mindedness.
VOLLEYBALL
Prerequisite PE 101
Course Credit
This is an introductory course in the theory and techniques of volleyball. The content focuses on the basic skills of volleyball and its application to the game including strategies and tactics. Furthermore, the student will learn about the volleyball laws of the game. As result of the class, the student will improve his / her general physical fitness and skill performance. The technical, tactical, physical, psychological, and social aspects of the game will also be taken up.
National Service Training Program
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 2 units (2 hours of lecture and laboratory per week)
As a requirement for graduation, students are required to complete two semesters of the National Service Training Program (NSTP) in any of three components: Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS), Literacy Training Service (LTS) and Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). CWTS refers to programs or activities contributory to the general welfare and the betterment of life for the members of the community or the enhancement of its facilities, especially those devoted to improving health, education, environment, entrepreneurship, safety, recreation and morals of the citizenry. LTS refers to the program component designed to train the students to teach literacy and numeric skills to schoolchildren, out-of-school youths and other segments of society in need of their services. Finally, ROTC refers to the program component institutionalized under Section 38 and 39 of Republic Act no. 7077, designed to provide military training to tertiary level students in order to motivate, train, organize and mobilize them for national defense preparedness. Students who opt to take either CWTS or LTS components can enroll in the College’s own NSTP offerings, while students who opt for ROTC must cross-enroll in a duly accredited tertiary institution offering such a component.
National Service Training Program: CWTS or Literacy Training Service
Prerequisite NSTP 1
Course Credit 2 units (2 hours of lecture and laboratory per week)
As a requirement for graduation, students are required to complete two semesters of the National Service Training Program (NSTP) in any of three components: Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS), Literacy Training Service (LTS) and Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). CWTS refers to programs or activities contributory to the general welfare and the betterment of life for the members of the community or the enhancement of its facilities, especially those devoted to improving health, education, environment, entrepreneurship, safety, recreation and morals of the citizenry. LTS refers to the program component designed to train the students to teach literacy and numeric skills to schoolchildren, out-of-school youths and other segments of society in need of their services. Finally, ROTC refers to the program component institutionalized under Section 38 and 39 of Republic Act no. 7077, designed to provide military training to tertiary level students in order to motivate, train, organize and mobilize them for national defense preparedness. Students who opt to take either CWTS or LTS components can enroll in the College’s own NSTP offerings, while students who opt for ROTC must cross-enroll in a duly accredited tertiary institution offering such a component.
Business Education Core
Principles of Economics
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of economics is essential for well-informed citizens and is therefore important in a democratic political system. It is also vital for those who are operating or working in companies. The course will therefore cover some fundamental principles that underlie economic behavior and activity. It will provide students with the tools to analyze economic events, explain why they occur, and make predictions about the likely outcome of a given set of economic circumstances. The course will encompass both micro-economics, which focuses on the activities of individual firms, households and markets, and macroeconomics, which focuses on national and international developments. A heavy emphasis will be placed on the role of markets and on the demand and supply model. In addition the course will look at the role of incentives in guiding economic behavior. This is an introductory course and for that reason will seek to give students an intuitive understanding of the subject using examples from the Philippines and Asia, as much as possible. The use of mathematics will be kept to a minimum. The course will require active participation by students. This will take the form of presentations on topical economic issues for discussion and analysis in classes.
Managerial Accounting
Prerequisite Accounting I
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Managerial Accounting measures, analyzes and reports financial and non-financial information of organizations helping managers make optimal decisions to fulfill all organizational goals. It is divided into three disciplines namely Full Cost Accounting, Differential Accounting (comparative accounting analysis) and Responsibility Accounting (or budgeting) using cost and revenue allocation techniques and methods. It also covers the Revenue cycle of organizations hotels and how these are earned and realized.
Business Law
Prerequisite Basic Computer
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course presents a comprehensive study of the legal aspects of business industry with emphasis on compliance and prevention of liabilities. The course also provides an understanding of the basic foundations and principles of the laws affecting the industry, as well as guidelines and techniques that show students how to manage preventatively and apply a practical legal awareness to their actions.
Total Quality Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course aims to enable participants to recognize and assess quality management processes in a business organization and to evaluate departmental processes and planning strategies.
Human Behavior in Organizations
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is an introduction to the concepts, theories and ideas guiding behavior at work. This course will introduce you to a wide array of theories on topics relevant to understanding employee and managerial behavior and provide insight and hands-on experience on how to use this knowledge to address problems that you will face in organizations. Some of the topics covered in this course include the study of personality, motivation, work attitudes and leadership. Some of the questions that we will address include: How do we effectively motivate employees? How does personality affect job performance? What leadership styles are effective with different employees? We will be applying theories at the organizational, group and individual levels of analysis and tying them in to examples of real-world applications.
Social Responsibility & Good Governance
Prerequisite Basic Accounting
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course examines the rationale behind the proposition that business has a responsibility to society beyond that of wealth creation. It emphasizes values-based decision making and encourages the students to apply their own values to issues such as satisfaction of various stakeholders, employee welfare, responsibility to the consumers, and leadership challenges of the international marketplace.
Business Process Management and Consulting Professional Courses
Operations Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course tackles the nature, scope, functions and importance of production and operations management in business, with particular focus on firms involved in business process outsourcing. It includes discussions on productivity, competitiveness and strategy, production system design, process selection, facilities layout, design of work systems. Cases will also be used to illustrate and apply the basic production and operations concepts and tools commonly used in business firms.
Project Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course revolves around the attributes that characterize a project, the steps and the variables involved in the project management process, including determining time lines and achievement of targets.
Training and Development
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course covers essentials of training and development as a systematic, integrated and planned approach to improving the effectiveness of groups of people and of the whole organization. Analysis of training needs, determining training objectives and designing effective training programs that facilitate the learning process are some of the topics that will be covered.
Professional Consulting
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The themes of this course are innovation and sustainable growth. Our focus is to facilitate the survival and growth of existing businesses. The course is organized into two major components, and these are pursued in parallel with each other. Students will be exposed to a series of modules that address various aspects of the consulting experience. In the first component, the modules are designed around a three-stage model intended to guide teams as they approach, decipher, and ultimately create value for the enterprise. The second component involves actual consulting interventions. Students will be organized into teams of three, and each team will be assigned to one consulting client. The teams will meet regularly with each client, and, employing the three-stage model, move through an evolving series of steps which culminate in a set of value-creating deliverables for the client, and a final consulting report.
Strategic Management and Leadership
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Strategic Operations Management deals with the Formulation, Implementation, Monitoring, Control & Evaluation of optimal Organizational Strategies by analyzing the firm’s Vision-Mission, Internal Environment, External Environment, & its Key Result Areas. The subject further expands to Strategic Leadership where it trains and molds future leaders to be strategic, efficient and advance in decision making, organizing leading and controlling, both quantitatively and qualitatively.
Cross-cultural Communication
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A course designed to help students meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, students will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its overarching goals are to help the become more sensitive to intercultural communication differences, and to provide students with the knowledge and skills that will help them interact successfully with people from cultures other than their own.
Supply Chain Planning
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of the effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system.
Negotiation and Conflict Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Negotiation and Conflict Management presents negotiation theory – strategies and styles – within an employment context. The course covers conflict management as a first party and as a third party; third-party skills include helping others deal directly with their conflicts, mediation, investigation, arbitration, and helping the system change as a result of a dispute.
Finance and Wealth Management Professional Courses
International Financial Markets and Institutions
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The current global financial crisis is highlighting the need for a new cadre of international financial analysts and managers who understand: (i) the roots and dynamics of past and present global and regional financial ups and downs, (ii) the roles, in terms of policies and influences, of national and multilateral central banks and regulatory bodies, and (iii) risk management on the business and country levels. Focus will be on liquidity, solvency, and public trust issues.
Quantitative Methods and Economics for Finance
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The focus of this course is on financial theory and empirical evidence for making investment decisions. Topics include: portfolio theory; equilibrium models of security prices (including the capital asset pricing model and the arbitrage pricing theory); the empirical behavior of security prices; market efficiency; performance evaluation; and behavioral finance.
Capital Market and Value Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The focus of this course is on corporate finance and capital markets, emphasizing the financial aspects of managerial decisions. It touches on all areas of finance, including the valuation of real and financial assets, risk management and financial derivatives, the trade-off between risk and expected return, and corporate financing and dividend policy. The course draws heavily on empirical research to help guide managerial decisions.
Investment Portfolio Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course introduces students to the concepts, methods, and tools used by financial managers and financial analysts to develop a framework for managing investment portfolios.
Wealth Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of wealth management. This course is aimed at students who wish to build upon their previous knowledge of financial markets and products by analysing and evaluating the core financial service of wealth management. It also examines the core features of a typical wealth management division including investment services, brokerage and financial planning as well as international and private banking.
Strategic Management and Leadership
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Strategic Operations Management deals with the Formulation, Implementation, Monitoring, Control & Evaluation of optimal Organizational Strategies by analyzing the firm’s Vision-Mission, Internal Environment, External Environment, & its Key Result Areas. The subject further expands to Strategic Leadership where it trains and molds future leaders to be strategic, efficient and advance in decision making, organizing leading and controlling, both quantitatively and qualitatively.
Corporate Finance
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The course presents the basic insights of corporate finance theory, but emphasizes the application of theory to real business decisions. Each session involves class discussion, some centered on lectures and others around business cases.
Financial Analysis and Reporting
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The purpose of this class is to advance your understanding of how to use financial information to value and analyze firms. We will apply your economics/accounting/finance skills to problems from today’s business news to help us understand what is contained in financial reports, why firms report certain information, and how to be a sophisticated user of this information.
Financial Engineering
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of financial engineering which is defined as the use of financial instruments such as forwards, futures, swaps, options, and related products to restructure or rearrange cash flows in order to achieve particular financial goals, particularly the management of financial risk.
Behavioral Finance and High-Net-Worth Individuals and Organizations
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of behavioral factors influencing financial markets and the corporate world. This course targets the link between the peculiarities of human behavior and aspects of financial and investment management, as well as corporate and risk management. In addition, the course puts various “behavioral mechanisms” into more basic psychological framework spanning the mechanisms of information perception, emotions, memory, and attention.
Retirement Planning
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of the various retirement plans available with an examination of the differences between qualified and non-qualified plans and the different social plans available to individuals. We also look at how financial planners help individuals coordinate the types of plans they are offered through their employer with the various individual plans available, thus helping the individual meet their planning needs.
Real Estate Finance and Investment
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of the most fundamental concepts, principles, analytical methods and tools useful for making investment and finance decisions regarding commercial real estate assets. As the first of a two-course sequence, this course will focus on the basic building blocks and the “micro” level, which pertains to individual properties and deals.
Asset Valuation and Venture Capital
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of the elements of entrepreneurial finance, focusing on technology-based start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. It addresses key questions which challenge all entrepreneurs: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured.
Ethical Practice
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The course is designed as an introduction to ethics in business with a focus on business management. Over 13 sessions, students will have the opportunity to explore theoretical concepts in business ethics, as well as cases that represent the challenges they will likely face as managers; they will also have the opportunity to work with guest faculty and business and other professional practitioners. Individual sessions will take the form of moderated discussion, with occasional short lectures from the instructor. We seek to define terms central to each of these circles, culminating in a brief historical assessment of business and capital in the early 21st century.
マーケティングマネージメント
Fundamentals of Marketing Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of marketing, including customer orientation, matched with attention to competition and core strengths. It is organized so that each class is either a lecture or a case discussion. Together with their other core courses, students have the option of taking this course or an introductory finance course. This course is a prerequisite for all of the advanced marketing courses.
Customer Relationship Management
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The goal of this course is to develop understanding and application of the concept and principles of CRM. Content includes the customer driven, market-based practices that enable a business to attract, satisfy and retain customers’ profitability.
Digital Marketing
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Digital channels are scooping up share, and marketers are wrestling with a whole new series of tools and challenges, whether it be blogs, social networking, user generated content, the transformation of video on the web, among many others. Most organizations today are struggling to adapt to a fundamentally new paradigm in managing their brands, product portfolios and customer relationships. The implications on pricing, channels, advertising, media mix are undergoing real scrutiny inside the Fortune 500.
Listening to the Customer
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Marketing research may be divided into methods that emphasize understanding “the customer” and methods that emphasize understanding “the market.” This course deals with the customer and emphasizes qualitative methods (interviews, focus groups, Voice of the Customer, composing questions for a survey). The companion course deals with the market and emphasizes quantitative methods (sampling, survey execution, quantitative data interpretation, conjoint analysis, factor analysis). The methods covered are often used in the “front-end” of market research project, whose second-stage is a quantitative survey. The quality of information gathered in the second-stage is greatly enhanced in this way. The first stage is designed for the nonspecialist, e.g., someone planning a career in general management, product or project management, R&D, advertising, or entrepreneurship. The second stage teaches analytical techniques that are standard in consulting or marketing research, and is ideally suited for students planning careers in those fields.
Advertising
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The idea behind the course is to present you with a problem (design a campaign for a rational advertiser – as contrasted to an “oddvertiser”), have you solve this problem as you would in the real world, and gain experience with persuasion techniques in the process. You can practice persuasion techniques in reports, presentations, and projects. Examines the uses of advertising and advertising campaigns by business and e-business, giving emphasis to the patterns and types of marketing strategy and its various functions, legal and moral obligations, problems in developing and evaluating advertising programs, budgeting, scheduling, and client-advertising agency relationship.
Professional Selling
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The entrepreneur and the manager must not only understand the sales process but also embrace the fact that the ability to sell is the single most critical success factor of any enterprise, whether new or ongoing. This course does not approach sales from the vaunted perspective of ‘strategy.’ It gets right into the very practical and tactical ins and outs of how to sell products and services to a sophisticated marketplace. Then the course moves into the more complex subject of how to build and manage a sales force and covers subjects such as building compensation systems for a sales force, assigning territories, resolving disputes and dealing with channel conflicts.
Modern Marketing Strategies
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course is intended to provide the frameworks, functions and workings of businesses based on innovation and creativity. It includes modern marketing strategies such as e-strategy, Blue Ocean Strategy and Bottom-of-the-Pyramid Strategy.
Strategic Management and Leadership
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
Strategic Operations Management deals with the Formulation, Implementation, Monitoring, Control & Evaluation of optimal Organizational Strategies by analyzing the firm’s Vision-Mission, Internal Environment, External Environment, & its Key Result Areas. The subject further expands to Strategic Leadership where it trains and molds future leaders to be strategic, efficient and advance in decision making, organizing leading and controlling, both quantitatively and qualitatively.
Integrated Marketing Communication
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course, primarily discussion based, provides a framework for understanding pricing strategies and tactics. Topics covered include pricing in competitive markets, estimating demand, price discrimination, the role of price cues, anticipating competitive responses, pricing in business to business markets, and pricing of new products. Lectures and cases are the primary modes of learning.
Global Marketing
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and constraints on either managing an existing or starting a new business in today’s fast-changing economy.
Social and Political Marketing
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
This course explores the new emerging field of marketing ideas – versus marketing commercial commodities, tangibles and non-tangibles – in the social, political and public arenas. Cutting edge concepts, theories, strategies, tools and case studies in changing social behavior, activism, cause-related marketing, running political campaigns, crisis management, nation-branding and public diplomacy will be examined in this course.
Ethics in Marketing
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units (3 hours of lecture per week)
A basic understanding of the wide range of ethical decisions that face the marketing professional. This course will include but is not limited to investigations of ethical issues in pricing, selling, advertising, distribution, product design, packaging and in dealings with suppliers. Special attention will also be placed on covering how ethical codes can be developed and how ethical behavior can be encouraged among employees.
テクノロジーマネージメント
COMP 101 / ITC 110 Basic Computer (Technology Management Fundamentals)
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
This course is an introduction to technology management and its major areas, including computer hardware and networking, computer operating systems, and common business and productivity applications. A substantial portion of the course is devoted to helping students acquire proficiency in the functional and effective use of common office automation applications such as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software applications, with particular emphasis on word processing and presentations, in order to make students capable of producing high quality documents from both a technical and an aesthetic viewpoint.
ITC 120 Fundamentals of Programming
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
This course prepares beginning programmers with the most important principles for developing structured program logic. It takes a unique language independent approach to programming with distinctive emphasis on modern conventions. Highly technical jargons are eliminated while introducing universal programming concepts and encouraging a strong programming style and logic thinking. Flowcharts, pseudo-code and diagrams are utilized to ensure that students with prior programming experience fully understand programming and design concepts.
ITC 130 Data and File Structures
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
Algorithms are at the heart of every nontrivial computer application, and algorithmics is a modern and active area of computer science. Every computer scientist and every professional programmer should know about the basic algorithmic toolbox: structures that allow efficient organization and retrieval of data, frequently used algorithms, and basic techniques for modeling, understanding and solving algorithmic problems. This course is a concise introduction addressed to students familiar with programming and basic mathematical language. It covers arrays and linked lists, hash tables and associative arrays, sorting and selection, priority queues, sorted sequences, graph representation, graph traversal, shortest paths, minimum spanning trees, and optimization. The algorithms are presented in a modern way, with explicitly formulated invariants, and comment on recent trends such as algorithm engineering, memory hierarchies, algorithm libraries and certifying algorithms. Pictures, words and high-level pseudo-code are used to explain the algorithms, and efficient implementations using real programming languages like C++ and Java are discussed in more detail. The course gives clear presentation, with examples, pictures, informal explanations, exercises, and some linkage to the real world.
ITC 140 Discrete Structures
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
This course will help students develop logical and mathematical concepts necessary to understand and analyze computational systems. It introduces concepts, techniques and skills necessary to comprehend the underlying structure of problems encountered in designing and implementing computer systems and software. Foundations for understanding computer science topics that rely upon the comprehension of formal abstract concepts will be provided.
ITC 150 Network Systems: Design and Administration
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking theory, concepts and requirements relative to telecommunications and networking technologies, structures, hardware and software. Emphasis is on the concepts of communications theory and practices, terminology, and the analysis and design of networking applications. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis and evaluation of connectivity options are covered. Students can design, build and maintain a local area network (LAN). It gives a structured approach to explaining how networks work from the inside out starting with an explanation of the physical layer of networking, computer hardware and transmission systems up to network applications. In-depth application coverage includes email; the domain name system; the World Wide Web (both client- and server-side); and multimedia (including voice over IP, Internet radio video on demand, video conferencing, and streaming media. It presents key principles, then illustrates these utilizing real-world example networks—the Internet, and wireless networks, including Wireless LANs, broadband wireless and Bluetooth and network security.
ITC 160 Ethics in Information Technology
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
This course gives the students a strong understanding of the legal, ethical, and societal implications of information technology. It provides the most up-to-date, thorough coverage of newsworthy technology developments and their impact on business today. Issues surrounding professional codes of ethics, file sharing, and infringement of intellectual property, security risk assessment, Internet crime, identity theft, employee surveillance, privacy, compliance, social networking, and the ethics of IT corporations are examined. It gives students an excellent foundation in ethical decision-making for current and future business managers and IT professionals and prepares them to be responsible in addressing ethical issues in today’s workplace.
ITC 210 Continuous Business Process Improvement
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
The course aims to educate students about the importance of robust business processes in delivering operational effectiveness. Students will be exposed to the process view of an organization – a radical departure from the traditional functional view. Frameworks for analyzing and improving business processes will also be shared. The course culminates with a discussion of change management techniques meant to institutionalize a continuous business process improvement mindset within an organization.
ITC 230 Technology Management
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
Business and technology are vital components of successful businesses and organizations. This course presents management concepts that lead to an understanding of information technology and its role within the enterprise as well as in building a nation. Building consensus among business and technology professionals using modern approaches to strategic planning, business process re-engineering and systems development are discussed. The goal is to help students learn how to use and manage information technologies to revitalize business processes, improve decision making and gain competitive advantage. Major emphasis is placed on up-to-date coverage of the essential role of the internet technologies in providing a platform for business, commerce and collaboration processes among all business stakeholders in today’s networked enterprises and global markets. The course also familiarizes students with the strategic significance of information technology in various industries. Technological developments in hotel operations areas—e.g., reservations, guest tracking, rooms management, inventory control, restaurant systems, electronic cash registers and point-of-sale devices, bar and beverage systems, and telephone and security- management systems, etc. are discussed — a substantial portion of the course is thereafter devoted to giving students hands-on exposure in various computer applications currently in use within the industry, particularly for hotel management and food and beverage. Students will be provided adequate hands-on introduction to current versions of the Fidelio Property Management System software or other widely-used hotel management software.
ITC 240 Human Computer Interaction
Prerequisite None
Course Credit 3 units
This course focuses on the architectures, mathematics, and algorithms that are integral to creating reliable user interfaces. It covers the concepts required for current graphical user interfaces, including specific emphasis on the Model-View-Controller architecture. It also provides an overview of key research areas in interactive systems, with a focus on the algorithms required to implement these systems. The use of clear descriptions, equations and pseudo-code, simplifies and demystifies the development and application of a variety of user interfaces. The course highlights the design, development, and evaluation of human-computer interfaces, with an emphasis on usability, interaction paradigms, computer-mediated human activities, and implications to society.
ITC 250 Database Development and Administration
Prerequisite
Course Credit None
This course covers the design and implementation of information systems within a database management system environment. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the design process acquired in earlier courses by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement logical design. Topics include data models and modeling tools and techniques; approaches to structural and object design; models for databases (relational, hierarchical, networked and object-oriented designs); CASE tools; data dictionaries, repositories and warehouses; Windows/GUI coding and/or implementation; code and application generation; client-server planning, testing and installation; system conversion; end-user training and integration and post-implementation review.
ITC 260 Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
Organizations in today’s dynamic environment are continually striving to improve their operational efficiency, many of which are dependent on technological improvements. Furthermore, new business models using technology are also being proposed routinely. Successful systems and enterprise projects require managers to understand systems development process and successful delivery of complex systems from a business process perspective. Students will learn to analyze, model and design business system and process requirements using common tools and methodologies. Students will apply concepts from class to a real-life systems development project of their choice. Students are introduced to the principles and techniques of systems analysis and design methods with particular emphasis on information systems. The conceptual architecture of an information system, information systems framework and conceptual building blocks are introduced. The systems modeling, design and implementation, two major elements of information systems analysis, are discussed in the context of life-cycle phases. The concept and techniques of information systems models, such as data model and process model are discussed in depth. An appreciation of multi-disciplinary approach needed for systems analysis and management will be gained through an understanding of information systems project management techniques, tools, and skills required for a successful completion of an information system analysis and design project.
ITC 270 System Infrastructure and Integration
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
This course provides the hardware/software technology background for information technology personnel. Hardware topics include CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets and a variety of input/output devices. Software topics include operating system modules, process management, memory and file system management. Also included are basic network components and multi-user operating systems. One of the roles of the IT professional is to design and build systems and integrate them into an organization. Students will encounter a variety of platforms in their careers. The role of the IT professional is to select, deploy, integrate and administer platforms or components to support the organization’s IT infrastructure.
ITC 280 Application Development: Depl, Main, and Services
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
In this mobile world era, everyone wants to develop applications for mobile devices. There is lots of material available about mobile application development on the web but very little know about how to start. Mobile Apps Development is changing the way we communicate, do business, and access to news and entertainment. Mobile application development is important because of its accessibility: files and data can be accessed via mobile applications. The market for application development is growing at a rapid pace. The continuous growth and advancements in mobile application development have led to rapid development to mobile phone market. This course allows students to create native apps across platforms and Web apps for today’s most popular smartphone platforms with Duffy’s PROGRAMMING WITH MOBILE APPLICATIONS: ANDROIDTM, iOS, AND WINDOWS® PHONE 7. The course’ unique, hands- on tutorial approach combines a clear presentation with numerous screenshots and step-by- step instructions to guide students in developing applicationsfor GoogleTM AndroidTM, Apple® iOS, and Windows® Phone 7.
ITC 290 Enterprise IT Project Management
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
Although project management has been an established field for many years, managing information technology requires ideas and information that go beyond standard project management. By weaving together theory and practice, students will be presented with an understandable, integrated view of the many concepts skills, tools, and techniques involved in project management. Because the project management field and the technology industry change rapidly, up-to-date information on how good project management and effective use of software can help manage projects, especially information technology projects will be provided. Application of nine project management knowledge areas–project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management–and all five process groups–initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing–to information technology projects will be discussed.
ITC 300 Technology Management Planning
Prerequisite
Course Credit 3 units
The foundation of a successful technology management strategic plan is the recognition that business direction and requirements must drive the TM strategy and computing architecture. This course outlines a quick and easy approach with concepts, techniques, and templates for analyzing, organizing, communicating, and implementing a TM strategy. This approach unites an organization in a collaborative effort resulting in a solid direction that has the support of the entire organization. Establishing this direction cultivates the support of management, enabling necessary strategic TM investments. The role of TM governance in strategic planning is highlighted reflecting advances in technology and a thorough planning methodology. The strategic planning process is supplemented by lessons learned from applying the process in numerous companies, cultures, and environments.
Sustainability
SUST101 Principles of Sustainability
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
Sustainability is a holistic approach to ensure that economic growth and material improvement are socially inclusive and environmentally responsible. This course will explore the history and philosophy of sustainability; creating a culture of sustainability; and the concept of sustainable development.
SUST110 Sustainable Planet
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
This course will lay the groundwork for understanding the complex problems facing the world today and the measures being taken by all UN member countries toward the achievement of our ultimate common goal: a Sustainable Planet for all.
SUST120 Green Buildings, Hotels and Resorts
Prerequisite  SUST120
Course Credit 3 units
Research studies have shown that buildings are the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption around the world. Water usage, indoor air quality, and solid waste and sewage generation are also major issues of concern for buildings. These issues have led to the birth of Sustainable Architecture and Green Building Design, Construction and Operations as key disciplines for a sustainable world.

This course will delve into these key disciplines to give students up-to-date information on best practices and certification programs from selected countries. Students will also learn Green Building principles as applied to Hotels and Resorts, with specific sustainability management programs tailored for these types of establishments. Case studies will be presented and site visits at nearby green buildings will be arranged for the students.

SUST201 Sustainable Cities and Transportation
Prerequisite  SUST201
Course Credit SUST201
Rapid urbanization is a challenge that the entire world faces, especially in developing countries where the rate of urban migration is happening fastest. Some of the major themes explored in the context of the sustainability of cities are social and environmental metrics, demographic trends, urban poverty and slums, green building, urban sprawl, global climate change, and sustainable energy and transportation policies
SUST210 Sustainable Food Systems
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit None
This course will deal on the subject of agriculture and its effects on the planet and society. Examples of local and global scale food systems will be investigated focusing on economic, social, ethical, and environmental factors. Closed loop food systems such as permaculture will be explored.
SUST220 Policy and Governance for Sustainability
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
Sustainability is a holistic approach to ensure that economic growth and material improvement are socially inclusive and environmentally responsible. Policies for sustainability are being crafted and adopted by governments and corporations worldwide. The first half of this course will explore examples of sustainability policies adopted by national and local government units, and the new legislation and regulations that result from these policies. The second half of this course will be devoted to case studies of corporate sustainability policies: how they are formulated, integrated, and implemented, and the transition management needed.
SUST230 Energy, Water and Waste Management Technologies
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
Some of the world’s biggest environmental problems are caused by the unsustainable consumption of non-renewable energy and water resources and the mounting volume of solid waste and wastewater generated by an ever-growing population. Environmental technologies provide innovative solutions to these problems. This course gives the students a closer look at proven management strategies and best available technologies that: (1) conserve non-renewable energy resources; (2) utilize renewable energy resources; (3) conserve water resources; (4) treat sewage and industrial wastewater to meet water quality discharge standards; (5) reduce, reuse, and recycle solid wastes; and (6) treat hazardous wastes to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Case studies of actual organizations that utilize best practices and technologies will be presented. Students will also learn how to estimate and reduce their “personal carbon footprint” in relation to their daily energy and water usage and the waste they generate.
SUST301 Green Product Design and Life Cycle Analysis
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
This Green Product Design and Life Cycle Analysis course will explore how leading product designers and manufacturers are also taking into account social and environmental considerations in their processes. Great design goes beyond the look and feel of a product and how well it works. Students will explore the concept of a product’s embodied energy and how that affects its overall sustainability. Examples of fair-trade products will also be investigated in order to understand their societal impacts. A thorough understanding of the green product design process will be done through the lens of product life-cycle analysis.
SUST310 Socio-Ecological Entrepreneurship
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
This course will explore the concept of sustainable development through socio-ecological entrepreneurship (SEE). Socio-ecological entrepreneurship strives to solve social and environmental problems at a systemic level using innovative, sustainable, scalable, and measurable approaches.

Socio-ecological entrepreneurs are transformative forces. They have new pattern-changing ideas to address major problems, and they are relentless in the pursuit of their vision, will not take no for an answer, and will not give up until they have spread their ideas as far as they possibly can.

SUST320 Sustainability Metrics and Reporting
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Framework and its most current “G4 Guidelines” will be used as the main template for learning in this course. Case studies of actual organizations’ GRI Sustainability Reports will be presented and analyzed. Groups of students will plan, research, prepare and present group-authored GRI Sustainability Reports for partner organizations.
SUST410 Renewable Energy Systems and Applications
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
Climate change, population growth, and fossil fuel depletion mean that renewable energy (RE) systems will need to play a bigger role in the future than they do today. This course will explore different types of RE systems and applications of solar energy, hydropower, wind power, geothermal energy, biomass energy, fuel cells, and other emerging RE technologies. The latest developments in RE commercialization, industry trends, and policy trends will be presented through case studies.
SUST420 Ecological Systems: Marine Protected Areas
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
This subject will study the marine protected area (MPA) as an ecological system in the global context. The environmental services that the ocean provides will be investigated to understand how important the ocean is to all life on Earth. Case studies will be evaluated to learn how MPAs can create sustainable systems in the Philippines and abroad. MPA management strategies will be analyzed. And the steps needed for the development of an MPA in the Philippines will be studied. Students will learn why and how to be stewards of the sea.
SUST430 1. International Development and Sustainability
Prerequisite  None
Course Credit 3 units
The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals clearly emphasize the need for international cooperation to help those living in poverty and hunger. This course will delve into case studies of international organizations (governmental and non-governmental): their history, accomplishments, and major sustainability programs. Focus will be on the larger and more established organizations, such as the United Nations Development Programme; World Bank; Asian Development Bank; International Finance Corporation; World Health Organization; United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; United States Agency for International Development; Canadian International Development Agency; German Development Cooperation; Japan International Cooperation Agency; and the World Wildlife Fund. All of these organizations have offices in the Philippines; their representatives will be invited to give guest lectures in this course.